Descent Into the Amazon

There is no moment of delight in any pilgrimage like the beginning of it.

The Amazon rainforest is one of the most isolated places on Earth, making it no easy trip to get there. Leaving from Quito, we spent a well-worth 12 hours of travelling to make it to the Tiputini Biodiversity Station in eastern Ecuador. It took a plane ride, two bus rides and two boat rides to make it to our final destination. From Quito, we flew into Coca, also known as Puerto Francisco de Orellana after the Spanish “founder” of the Amazon. Here we were greeted by some friendly squirrel monkeys and a blue-and-yellow parrot that made sure we noticed her at a water-front hotel we were waiting at for our boat ride down the Napo River (which by the way, is, indeed, highly illegal for these animals to be here but in a country like Ecuador, it’s just one of those things that people constantly get away with). We had a chance to visit the weekly town market where we found an array of animal mantecas and medicinal plants (keep an eye out for a later blog I will post on this.)

A blue-and-yellow parrot greeted us in Coca with a "Que ricaaaa" call.

A squirrel monkey hanging out on a tree outside a hotel in Coca. Capturing these animals for pet use is illegal but obviously still done successfully in Ecuador.

One thing is for sure: this squirrel monkey is completely accustomed to people and in my opinion is the cutest and most friendly monkey out there.

A marmoset monkey also at the hotel.

Om nom nom nom...

Golden-mantled tamarin. This fluffy little monkey is common in edge-effected areas of the Amazon and is identified by its prehensile tail and frown-like facial hair.

From Coca, it was off to the Napo River for us. Once we got to the end of the river, we exited off the boat onto oil territory. One thing about the Amazon, at least in Ecuador, is that the only roads present were built by your’s truly, the oil companies. In order to continue to our destination, we had to pass through oil security. Once that was settled, we bused it to the Tiputini River.

Our definition of a "bus."

A girl in front of her house that I caught while on our bus ride to the Tiputini River. This is a typical house in the Orient and although, oil companies have promised economic advantages to locals, not much "progress" has been seen in these areas.

An oil company's sign on the road shows there absolute presence in this area.

The oil companies of Ecuador own all the roads in the Amazon. In order to get to our research station, we had to pass through oil security to be able to use the roads and their boat down the Napo River.

The Tiputini River is a tributary of the Napo River and forms the northern border of Yasuni National Park. This beautiful river wound its way down for miles of untouched Amazon rainforest, leading us to the Tiputini Biodiversity Research Station, which served as my home for the next month.

Riding down the Tiputini River.

We finally reached our destination: the beautiful Tiputini research station. Let the next month of adventures begin!

Advertisements